The Girl on the Train (2016) – Review

The girl on the train had so much build up that I decided to see it. Having read the book only a couple of months ago, the story was fresh in my mind. So here goes:

girl-on-train

Plot and Script

This is a story of three women, deeply flawed – whose lives get entangled without them wanting to. For those who don’t the plot, I won’t ruin it for you but Emily Blunt (Rachel) is a divorcee whose ex-husband Justin Theroux (Tom) is married to Rebecca Ferguson (Anna) and have a baby. Tom cheated on Rachel and she took to alcohol to get over the depression of not being able to have a baby.

The present – Rachel takes the train to NY every day though she was fired from her job just to feel normal and has been seeing this perfect couple from the train every day who seem to be very much in love – Luke Evans (Scott) and Haley Bennett (Megan) and longs to be in their place, in a life where she is loved and has a real family.

One day Rachel sees Megan kiss another man from the train and things go out of control there on. Its a missing person mystery which then becomes a murder mystery.

Okay I have to admit it. I didn’t like the book that much. It was interesting but it wasn’t super interesting and it definitely was not worth the hype. So I didn’t go in with too many expectations. The plot in the movie is more confusing than the book. The back and forth that Paula Hawkins has in her book has been reduced quite a bit but the turn of events is still not very seamless in the movie. Also, a lot has been missed out that is explained well in the movie like where does Rachel get the money for alcohol, the shame she feels every time she drinks, her relationship with her roommate Cathy – they all add to the narrative which the movie fails to do.

Characterization and Acting (C&A)

The acting to me seemed a little superficial from everyone. See, the book is tragic and it is able to establish that through emotions, thoughts, background stories which the movie was not able to show at all. Emily Blunt tries her best to show everything that her character Rachel feels – the shame, the guilt, the helplessness, the pity but how many such emotions can one actor play? I give her full points to try. The others are all very mediocre with not much character build up at all.

Sounds and Effects (S&E)

The music by Danny Elfman was probably the best part of the movie for me. It was quiet and suspenseful which is what you want in a thriller. It reminded me of Gone Girl and a lot of people are comparing this movie to Gone Girl, but that was a far superior thriller from all aspects.

Cinematography and Visuals (C&V)

The visuals and cinematography were good to a large extent. Again with the time periods it does look a little like Gone Girl but there is no comparison really.

Direction  and Overall (D &O)

Overall, I didn’t quite like the movie. I mean its definitely not a Gone Girl – there are problems in the screenplay and a book which is mostly about what one woman is thinking, it is difficult to bring out in movies. Superficial is the word.

So here are my scores:

Plot and Script (P&S)- 1

Characterization and Acting (C&A) – 1

Sounds and Effects (S&E) – 1.5

Cinematography and Visuals (C&V) – 1.5

Direction  and Overall (D &O) – 1

Overall Score – 6 out of 10

If you are really looking forward to this movie, my guess is that you will come out disappointed. For people who don’t care for the book/movie, wait for the DVD. Another failure of a book being adapted on to the big screen.

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10 thoughts on “The Girl on the Train (2016) – Review

  1. It seems we have similar feelings on this movie! I just saw it over the weekend and was also disappointed (I ranted about my disappointment in my own review haha). It had potential but didn’t quite live up to it, sadly.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Yeah $9 was a bit more than I wanted to spend, but at least I got a good laugh out of it! So disappointing. At least having read the book, we didn’t go into the movie with sky high expectations!

        Liked by 1 person

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